Machine Gun Therapy
Hey don’t poke me! I have fangs!

Hey don’t poke me! I have fangs!

A new song by Prince - The Breakdown » I was lucky enough to see him play this live last year with 3rdEyeGirl. <3

INFINITY AND HISTORY

What happens when someone you love dies? Everything. Nothing.

The dream of ‘happening’ or ‘not happening’ becomes irrelevant, there in the place beyond words. The self-contraction, the impossible dream of separation, the illusion of being a separate ‘me’ in a separate ‘world’, and along with it, the seeking, the stress, regret, guilt, pain, longing, tiredness, explodes into infinity. It is absolute relaxation into the Ground of who they really are.

What is lost for you? Your dream of their tomorrows. Your imagined future with them. Your plans, hopes, fantasies. What is not lost? Your shared history. The memories. The moments. The ups and the downs, the laughter and the tears, the sacred times you spent together, and none of this can be taken away.

They have only disappeared into infinity and history. You will always find them there, waiting for you, alive.

Jeff Foster (via oceanandwave)
Can Nothing Become Something

This talk by Thich Nhat Hanh really blew my mind. Like seriously. Boom.

Listen! May need to click here in a regular browser to get it to play. Worth it.

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Inevitably, the bogeyman is found to be only in our minds.

Inevitably, the bogeyman is found to be only in our minds.

“Avoidance of discomfort is one of the most powerful drives in us, yet much of its power derives from the belief—the false belief—that we can’t be happy if we’re uncomfortable. One of the great benefits of practice is learning that this belief is not, in fact, an unalterable truth.”

— 	 Ezra Bayda, Zen Heart: Simple Advice for Living with Mindfulness and Compassion

“Avoidance of discomfort is one of the most powerful drives in us, yet much of its power derives from the belief—the false belief—that we can’t be happy if we’re uncomfortable. One of the great benefits of practice is learning that this belief is not, in fact, an unalterable truth.”

— Ezra Bayda, Zen Heart: Simple Advice for Living with Mindfulness and Compassion

What Practice Is

Practice is about experiencing the truth of who we really are.

Practice is about being with our life as it is, not as we would like it to be.

Practice is about the clash between what we want and what is.

Practice is about the transformation of our unnecessary suffering.

Practice is about attending to, experiencing, wherever we are stuck, wherever we’re holding, whatever blocks us from our true nature.

Practice is about turning away from constantly seeking comfort and from trying to avoid pain.

Practice ultimately deals with just one thing: the fear at the base of human existence—the fear that I am not.

Practice is about willingly residing in whatever life presents to us.

Practice is about seeing through our belief systems; so even if they remain, they no longer run us.

Practice is about turning from a self-centered view to a life-centered view.

Practice is about learning to be no one; not giving solidity to any belief system—just being.

Practice is about learning to be happy; but we will never be happy until we truly experience our unhappiness.

Practice is about slowly increasing our awareness of who we are and how we relate to life.

Practice is about moving from a life of drama to a life of no drama.

Practice is always about returning to the true self.

Practice is about finally understanding the paradox that although everything is a mess, all is well.

Practice is about learning to say “Yes” to everything, even when we hate it.

Practice always comes back to just the willingness to be.

Ezra Bayda 
Zen Center of San Diego

What Practice Is

Practice is about experiencing the truth of who we really are.

Practice is about being with our life as it is, not as we would like it to be.

Practice is about the clash between what we want and what is.

Practice is about the transformation of our unnecessary suffering.

Practice is about attending to, experiencing, wherever we are stuck, wherever we’re holding, whatever blocks us from our true nature.

Practice is about turning away from constantly seeking comfort and from trying to avoid pain.

Practice ultimately deals with just one thing: the fear at the base of human existence—the fear that I am not.

Practice is about willingly residing in whatever life presents to us.

Practice is about seeing through our belief systems; so even if they remain, they no longer run us.

Practice is about turning from a self-centered view to a life-centered view.

Practice is about learning to be no one; not giving solidity to any belief system—just being.

Practice is about learning to be happy; but we will never be happy until we truly experience our unhappiness.

Practice is about slowly increasing our awareness of who we are and how we relate to life.

Practice is about moving from a life of drama to a life of no drama.

Practice is always about returning to the true self.

Practice is about finally understanding the paradox that although everything is a mess, all is well.

Practice is about learning to say “Yes” to everything, even when we hate it.

Practice always comes back to just the willingness to be.

Ezra Bayda
Zen Center of San Diego